Top 5 All Electric Cars

For those drivers who have decided to give the combustion engine the boot, and want to reduce their carbon footprint by choosing from an ever-growing list of all-electric cars, I’ve listed a few below. Unlike petrol-powered cars, there isn’t a great deal to compare, as stats are pretty average for the family all-electric models. However, if you want something a little faster, you might want to consider aerodynamic design and recharge times, and of course performance stats compared to price.

All Electric Cars

Tesla Model X

Tesla Model X

Out of the bunch, this car is in the middle, between sensible and all out sports – although it will come at a fair price – the S model will set you back $56,000. Its Falcon Wing doors certainly add character, reminders of the Merc SLS and the all time movie great Delorean – these also add serious styling points, plus their functionality came first. These brilliant Wings open up and out; even the narrowest of parking spaces isn’t a problem. The Model Xis offered with Dual Motor AWD (All-Wheel Drive). A second motor allows for all-weather, all-road capabilities by increasing torque by 50%. With AWD, this amazing bit if kit hits 60 mph in less than 5 seconds, outperforming the fastest SUVs and nearly matching the mighty M3.

Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG E-Cell

Mercedes-Benz SLS AMG E-Cell

In 2012, Mercedes unveiled their monster all-electric SLS, which also went on sale in October. The giant 48-kilowatt motor stomps out 571-horsepower and 649lb ft of torque, rocketing it to 62mph in just 3.7 seconds. Both axles have a motor, and the AMG Electric Drive features a liquid-cooled 400 V lithium-ion battery. The battery weighs 548 kg and is comprised of 12 modules, each housing 72 lithium-ion cells. The recharging is process is done via a 240-volt plug, with a complete recharge time of 8 hours at 16 amps. A highly sophisticated brake energy recuperation system is also used to recharge the battery whilst under braking.

Nissan Leaf

Nissan Leaf

A little bit more down to earth than the previous two cars, is this in-production vehicle, Nissan’s Leaf (Leading, Environmentally friendly, Affordable). This electric-only car can cover over 100 miles on a single charge, depending on the climate. The Leaf takes 8 hours to fully recharge, and can be done via a home dock, or if using a fast charger, this can be cut down to just ½ an hour. Nissan’s Leaf produces 120HP and 210ft-lbs of torque from its lithium battery powered front axle motor. The air-cooled cells produce 90-kilowatts, powering the Leaf to 60 mph in 9.9 secs and a top speed of 93 mph – not bad for a family battery car that can average the equivalent of 110 mpg in petrol.

Ford Focus Electric

Ford Focus Electric

The all-electric Focus uses a 6.6-kilowatt charger, taking 3 hours to fully charge from a home dock. Not really my thing (or most men, come to think of it), but Ford uses a visual dashboard system that shows butterflies as to how green you are driving. The Ford Focus is powered by a 100-kilowatt electric motor, producing a modest 130HP. A 23kWh lithium-ion battery delivering 92kW powers the motor, which gives the car 181 lb-ft of torque. Like the Leaf, this car tops 100 mpg equivalent in distance travelled per charge. With a top speed of just 84 mph, I’d have expected a little more considering its 130HP.

Volvo C30 Electric

Volvo C30 Electric

Swedish giants Volvo have confirmed their electric C30 is in production. Its exterior is identical to their regular C30, offering the same safety as the original. Despite it being a three-door, the C30 will be one of the first all-electric cars for families. Official figures also confirm it has a superior range (these figures challenge the claims of other companies stats) and better performance than all the other electric superminis. On the eco side of things, this C30 only consumes a quarter of the energy of a conventional petrol engine. With a top speed of 81 mph, and a 0-60mph time of 10.5 seconds, it’s capable of motorway driving, although only just. It’s battery range is 94 miles, a little less than Ford and Nissan claim, but Volvo are confident it’ll satisfy the needs of over 90% of European drivers.

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